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Tutorial Thursday: Salt Dough Cookie Ornaments Swap

I decided quite late to attend Convention, so I didn’t have a lot of time to make general swaps. I had the urge to bake, but knew that fresh cookies wouldn’t survive the journey to Salt Lake City, so I decided to make salt dough cookie ornaments instead. One batch of salt dough produced 40 good ornaments for swaps and a bunch of test cookies that ended up in the trash.

I forgot to take pictures of my completed ornaments before I left home, so I have to settle for a poor cell phone shot taken on a chair in the dark right before opening session.

Stampin' Up! convention swap cookie press salt dough cookie

Here’s how they were made.

Disclaimer: It probably goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyway, these are non-edible cookies. First, they have a ton of salt in them. Second, I colored them with INK. INK, people. Don’t even think about eating these!

SALT DOUGH

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 cup salt
  • 1 cup water (or as needed)

Mix together the flour and salt. Add as much water as necessary to make a non-sticky, rollable dough. Knead the dough for 5-10 minutes, and then let sit for at least 30 minutes. If the dough is too sticky, add more flour. If the dough is too dry, add more water.

Salt dough for use with Stampin' Up! cookie press

I divided the batch into five portions (large handfuls, more or less) and each portion made approximately 12 cookies.

Stampin' Up! classic ink bottle being used to dye salt dough for use with the cookie press
I used reinkers to dye the dough, approximately 8-10 drops per portion.

  • Pumpkin cookies = Pumpkin Pie Classic Ink
  • Heart cookies = Melon Mambo Classic Ink
  • Snowflake cookies = 6 parts Pool Party Classic Ink + 2 parts Island Indigo Classic Ink

Stampin' Up! classic ink bottle being used to dye salt dough for use with the cookie press

After dropping the ink onto the dough, knead the dough to distribute the color.

Next, roll the dough on a floured surface to about 1/4″ thickness. Use a circle cookie cutter or glass to cut circles from the dough. When you have cut all the circles you can, re-knead and re-roll the dough, then cut more circles. Repeat until you no longer have enough dough left for a circle.

Cutting circles in salt dough for use with the Stampin' Up! cookie press

Transfer your circles to a parchment lined cookie sheet. Use your Stampin’ Up! Sweet Pressed Cookie Stamps to stamp a design in the cookies.

Salt dough cookie circles waiting to be stamped with Stampin' Up! Sweet Pressed Cookie Stamp

For my swaps I used the “Holidays” stamps, but you can choose from six other styles.

Stampin' Up! Sweet Pressed Cookie Stamps

Use a straw to poke a hole in the top of each cookie before baking. This will give you a place to string your thread for the ornament.

Stampin' Up! Sweet Pressed Cookie Stamps Pumpkin Salt Dough Ornament

Bake your cookies for 15-20 minutes in a 300 degree oven. Your goal is to dry the cookies, not to brown them. Check your cookies at 10 minutes and then every few minutes after until they feel hard and dry. You can always underbake them and let them finish drying on the counter overnight, but if you bake them too long you can’t remove the burnt edges.

Stampin' Up! Sweet Pressed Cookie Press Salt Dough Ornaments in Oven

When your salt dough cookie ornaments have completed drying, you can add on some ribbon and wrap them in a matchbox cover (directions to come!). What a cute and easy homemade gift!

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